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Master Plan Digest: The Framework Behind the Redevelopment Master Plan

By analyzing everything we learned and reviewing the physical and financial constraints facing the project, our design team devised a potential direction for the Friendship Court redevelopment master plan.

The planning framework that emerged is based on existing conditions, stakeholder interviews, and—most importantly—the commitment to not displace current residents.

Here are some of the key design drivers that resulted from this process:

  • No displacement of current residents means a longer development timeline and the relocation of certain amenities.
  • Providing a mixed-income environment with greater opportunities and amenities is only possible with greater height and density.
  • To pursue an integrated approach to development, distribute affordable units evenly across the site and throughout the buildings.
  • Locating parking below buildings means creating more open space and associated amenities.
  • Relief on certain zoning requirements, such as parking, would support a greater number of affordable and workforce units.

The mixed-income nature of the new Friendship Court will provide a myriad of benefits, not only for the residents but also for the surrounding neighborhoods and the city as a whole: new connections, green infrastructure, open space, and an engaging design that activates local streets.

With a commitment to creating these amenities, cost becomes a larger factor. Collaboration between Piedmont Housing and the City of Charlottesville, among others, will be necessary to raise needed funds for this multifaceted development.

The draft master plan published in June included 480 residential units in buildings of four stories (three stories at Sixth and Monticello, where the buildings come closest to the Belmont neighborhood).

As Piedmont Housing and the design team worked through the possibilities for the site plan, we also worked through the costs and feasibility of that plan. It’s ambitious, with extensive development of the site, construction of new roads and pedestrian connections, structured parking below the buildings, extensive amenities and a long and costly phasing strategy required to avoid displacing current residents during redevelopment. We found that a project of 480 units, including 150 Section 8 units and 80 new affordable and workforce units, simply could not support all of that infrastructure.

To make the project financially feasible, we need to build 600 units. A project of this size would include all 150 Section 8 units; the 80 new affordable and workforce units; and 370 market-rate units. The additional market-rate units are necessary to bear the cost of infrastructure and, most important, to allow for creation of the below-market affordable and workforce units.

Simply increasing the height of buildings on Second and Garrett streets from four to six stories and increasing the maximum density from 43 units per acre to just over 51 units per acre can produce 600 units. (The building at the corner of Sixth and Monticello, nearest to the Belmont neighborhood, would remain at three stories.)

A somewhat taller and more dense project on the Friendship Court site is consistent with current uses surrounding the site and with several projects proposed for surrounding parcels.

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What do you think? Continue the conversation with a comment below.

In our next Master Plan blog post, we’ll take a look at plans to improve connectivity.

Source: Friendship Court Redevelopment Master Plan, December 2016 – Master Plan Proposal (The Plan: Planning Framework)