Tag Archives: CHIP

CHiP Neighborhood Outreach Stays Busy Helping Families with Their Health Improvement Program

Ciera, Family Support Worker does a home visit

Ciera, Family Support Worker does a home visit

Piedmont Housing Alliance connects with several area nonprofits to bring enriching support to the people we serve. CHiP is one of those partners, providing services to children and families throughout the area, including Friendship Court.

On any given day, you are likely to see a member of the CHiP Neighborhood Outreach team in a downtown neighborhood – visiting families at home, attending community events, or facilitating groups for teens and/or parents with young children.  Nurse Jessica might be checking in on a new mom to see how mom and baby are doing at home and answer questions about breast-feeding or how to know when to call the doctor. Naasira, one of the team’s family support workers, might be visiting a family with a busy toddler, bringing ideas for age-appropriate activities that can be created from simple household items.

Torri, Neighborhood Outreach Project Coordinator. Naasira, Family Support Worker and Regina, Community Health Educator help at market day in Friendship Court, photo credit Kayli Wren of Charlottesville Tomorrow

Torri, Neighborhood Outreach Project Coordinator. Naasira, Family Support Worker and Regina, Community Health Educator help at market day in Friendship Court, photo credit Kayli Wren of Charlottesville Tomorrow

CHiP is the Children’s Health Improvement Program.  Their mission is to partner with families to create nurturing home environments and promote the health and well-being of children in our community.  The CHiP program is completely voluntary and designed to serve families with children age 0-6.

Through home visits, CHIP works with children and parents in their own environment, eliminating the need to find transportation or childcare.  Home visits allow the entire family to participate. Meeting families where they live in those critical early years of a child’s life has proven to be the most effective model for helping kids grow up healthy and prepared to succeed in school and in life.

CHiP’s dedicated teams of community health nurses and professional family support workers meet with families to:

·        Promote family health and well-being through health assessments, health education, and facilitating access to health care.

·        Enhance parenting skills and confidence through a developmentally appropriate curriculum and building nurturing relationships.

·        Foster self-sufficiency by partnering with families to set goals, solve problems, and connect with community resources.

In light of the challenges our community faced in 2017, CHiP recognized that a distrust of systems and institutions are a barrier to health and well-being and contributes to racial disparities in care and health outcomes. Thanks to a grant from the Adiuvans Foundation, CHiP launched the Neighborhood Outreach Project, placing a team downtown dedicated to serving historically African American neighborhoods. In addition to the nurse/family support worker team, three part-time health educators were hired from within the community, all with the goal of building relationships and being a trusted neighborhood resource.

Teen Outreach and Neighborhood Outreach Project Coordinator, Torri Ayers, says, “We want to help parents be the best they can be, but it takes time for them to trust us. So we just keep showing up, without judgment, as a friendly, helpful neighbor.”

Bubble wands activity at Westhaven

Bubble wands activity at Westhaven

Torri has also been co-facilitating the girls group, Sisters of Nia, with City of Promise, and has started two more girls groups in Greenstone and Friendship Court. While CHiP’s Parenteen program provides unique support for pregnant and parenting teens, Torri’s work with pre-teen and teen girls is designed for prevention and long-term impact.  “I want to help these girls think differently, to expose them to new ideas and experiences so they can expand their imagination, hopes, and dreams for themselves and their family.”

 

CHiP means children’s health. If you want to learn more about CHiP or how to enroll in the program, visit www.jachip.org or call: 434-964-4700.

 

Girls at Friendship Court Benefit from Girls’ Mentoring Program

Mentoring

Each week, approximately eight to 10 girls from the Friendship Court community come together at the community center for an after-school mentoring program taught by Community Center Coordinator, Jessica Eldridge. Jessica, the founder of Impact My Life Mentoring, LLC says, “I believe even the slightest positive influence has the potential to change a child’s life.”

Starting in the fall of 2017 Jessica has led the girls in empowering activities and discussions about what it means to have self-confidence and self-esteem. During one of their discussions, the girls talked about how to distinguish between a friend and a frenemy (someone who acts as a friend, but when not around you, they do unfriendly things behind your back).

Girls mentoring

During another activity, the girls went outside and took five pictures of themselves, or five selfies, to create a group selfie art gallery. Then the girls wrote down a compliment about themselves on each picture. This small gesture allowed them time to think about who they are and how they are important, finding something to celebrate about themselves and share with others. On Diamond Keyes’ picture she wrote, “I like myself because I have a good personality and I am pretty, and I won’t think differently.”

Galentine's 4

Galentine's 1In January, the girls focused on New Year’s resolutions and what they hope to accomplish in the New Year.  Many of them talked about how they hope to do well in their next quarter of school and how they want to work towards getting good grades.  Then, in February, they celebrated “Galentine’s Day,” an unofficial holiday held on the day before Valentine’s Day in which ladies, young and old, celebrate themselves and others. In that session, they discussed the importance of making and having good friends as well as what types of characteristics they like to find in a good friend. They discussed positive qualities about themselves and how it felt when they looked in the mirror. Then the girls designed their own personal mirrors with paint, glitter, and stickers and enjoyed a meal together.

Jefferson Area CHIP has been partnering with the group as well. Their mission is to partner with families to create nurturing home environments and promote the health and well-being of children in our community.  Jessica says the girls have been enjoying their insight into their discussions and it also allows them room to interact with different people whom they’ve never met before – adults and young girls alike.

Jessica says, “The goal in teaching this program is for the girls to create a space that is all their own where they are free to express themselves in the way that they want without judgement from other people.”

She added that she has had some very proud moments so far with the girls and that she hopes to keep up the mentoring sessions for the foreseeable future.